Have you ever done something for a long time but haven’t yet reached the goal you originally set out for? At times you think you never will?

I’ve thought about that a lot lately.

In those moments, I’m lying in bed wide awake, reminding myself of all the shit that hasn’t gone the way I hoped. Whether it’s with my music, this website, or whatever—I think back to all the mistakes I’ve made and what I could’ve done differently.

Then, like a skitzo in a mental ward, I start talking to myself…

The chat starts harmless enough. “What’s the deal?”—or something similar. And then a rush of frustration and anger fills me. “Why can’t I get this shit done?”—comes next. Then (at the risk of sounding melodramatic) blame and anger crescendo into a crippling sensation of self doubt, bordering on self hatred.

And that’s when I snap out of it, refocus, and get back to work.

Maybe it’s what we learned from Tom Sterner about discipline and practice, or what Rick Barker taught us about Taylor Swift and how hard she works and that anything worth having in life is worth working for. Or perhaps when Steve Palfreyman told me that his success came when he stopped worrying if people would show up or not, and because of that, Music Launch Hub is one of the best groups for musicians on Facebook today.

It could be those… or the countless other things we’ve learned on Musician Monster.

The Moment That Left The Greatest Impact

But the moment that has had the greatest impact on me…was the decision I made in March of 2013.

I made up my mind that I was going to get what I wanted most in life. And that if that was meant to be, then it was up to me.

I made my decision and claimed responsibly for my every result. And that’s why I snap out of it.

From then on, I was in total control.

Think about it…

This is your life. It’s your desire, your thoughts, your decisions, your passion, and your truths that guide your music. Either you point them in the right direction…or you don’t.

You Already Have What It Takes

You and I learned to play and write music .If you couldn’t play something you wanted then you’d engage in deliberate practice. You as questions. You learn. You get training, and even work to change bad playing habits that negatively impact your playing. Even though you’ve played for years, you still choose to practice and improve.

You are in complete control.

As I say at the end of every podcast episode, in the same way you became a musician, is the same way you can become a more prosperous one.

And even when we don’t live up to our own standards, we know how to just suck it up and keep practicing. That’s why we already have what it takes.

Have you ever let frustration, impatience, fear, or self-doubt hold you back? How do you think the grind to become a musician relates to reaching your professional goals as a musician? Do you think you have what it takes or is something missing?

Let me know in the comments below.

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